A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945. World War Two Homefront, Women.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.
A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.

A Collection of Portraits of Workers at the Timken Roller Bearing Factory, Canton, Ohio, c. 1944-1945.

Canton: 1944-1945. Forty-three photographs, measuring 2 1/4x4 to 3 1/8x4 3/4 inches. Identifications to versos, generally fine condition. Item #List1209

Offered here are forty-three wartime portraits from the Timken Roller Bearing Company, a major producer of bearings for the war effort, with many pictures of women at work. The company produced an enormous amount of bearings for the war, supplying nearly sixteen million bearings for the jeeps used, twenty-four in each vehicle. The factory was located firmly in the rust belt in Canton, Ohio, close to the Detroit and Cleveland automobile producers and the Pittsburgh and Cleveland steel centers. The war effort saved the steel industry, which had struggled during the depression, with the nation producing 90 million tons of finished steel during the peak year of 1944, and 427 million tons from 1941 through 1945. The war was a springboard for the industry and for American industrial production in general through the 1960s before a widespread decline in the 1970s.

The role women played in wartime was enormous, with nineteen million women employed in the home front and millions more involved in volunteer efforts. Many of the women shown here are wearing head scarfs similar to Rosie the Riveter of Westinghouse poster fame. The inspiration for Rosie the Riveter was believed to be Geraldine Doyle of Michigan, who worked closeby in a Navy machine shop during World War II, or possibly Rose Will Monroe, who worked as a riveter at the Willow Run Bomber Plant outside of Detroit. The pictures - snapshot sized - were likely not taken as part of any publicity campaign, as they have the informality of snapshots and were taken with a basic flash from close range, likely by another worker. The subjects seem at ease with the photographer. Overall a surprisingly intimate group, showing an iconic and important period of American labor history.

Price: $1,750.00