Item #List2429 Circular / Treasury Department, March 25, 1795. Sir, It is necessary that I inform you that John Kean, Esquire, has resigned the office of Cashier of the Bank of the United States, in consequence of an Infirm state of health, and that George Simpson, Esquire, as been appointed his Successor. [Signed by Wolcott and Simpson]. Finance - Early Republic, George Simpson, Oliver Wolcott, United States Treasury Department.
Circular / Treasury Department, March 25, 1795. Sir, It is necessary that I inform you that John Kean, Esquire, has resigned the office of Cashier of the Bank of the United States, in consequence of an Infirm state of health, and that George Simpson, Esquire, as been appointed his Successor. [Signed by Wolcott and Simpson]

Circular / Treasury Department, March 25, 1795. Sir, It is necessary that I inform you that John Kean, Esquire, has resigned the office of Cashier of the Bank of the United States, in consequence of an Infirm state of health, and that George Simpson, Esquire, as been appointed his Successor. [Signed by Wolcott and Simpson]

Bath, Massachusetts: 1795. Folded circular, franked by Wolcott and addressed to William Webb, Esquire of Bath, Massachusetts [now Maine]. With the signature of George Simpson. Fine condition. Fine. Item #List2429

An uncommon treasury circular announcing the appointment of George Simpson as cashier, following the retirement of John Kean due to illness. Simpson would serve as cashier from his appointment in March of 1795 until the Bank’s decommission in 1811.
Simpson would take up residence across the street from the bank on Chestnut Street, and was hired by Stephen Girard as cashier of the Girard Bank, which operated out of the same building, in 1811. He would serve in this position until his death in November of 1822, after which Girard promoted Simpson’s first teller, Joseph Roberts, to be Cashier. We find no other examples of Simpson’s signature in the trade, though several letters to him have surfaced over the years. Despite his low profile from a policy standpoint he was a key figure in the Bank of the United States. We find no record of this circular institutionally, though it is listed in Bristol and Shipton and Mooney.

Wettereau, James O. “The Oldest Bank Building in the United States.” Transactions of the American Philosophical Society 43, no. 1 (1953): 70–79. https://doi.org/10.2307/1005663.

Wettereau, James O. “New Light on the First Bank of the United States.” The Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 61, no. 3 (1937): 263–85. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20087054.

Bristol B9395. Shipton & Mooney 47660.

Price: $1,500.00