Item #List2439 Lengthy Letter Describing the Food and Scenery of Vera Cruz, Written by Captain George Clutter of Wheeling, [West] Virginia, Captain of the the ‘Mountain Boys of Monongolia.’. Mexican-American War - Correspondence - Food, George Clutter.
Lengthy Letter Describing the Food and Scenery of Vera Cruz, Written by Captain George Clutter of Wheeling, [West] Virginia, Captain of the the ‘Mountain Boys of Monongolia.’
Lengthy Letter Describing the Food and Scenery of Vera Cruz, Written by Captain George Clutter of Wheeling, [West] Virginia, Captain of the the ‘Mountain Boys of Monongolia.’
Lengthy Letter Describing the Food and Scenery of Vera Cruz, Written by Captain George Clutter of Wheeling, [West] Virginia, Captain of the the ‘Mountain Boys of Monongolia.’
[Mexican-American War - Correspondence - Food] Clutter, George

Lengthy Letter Describing the Food and Scenery of Vera Cruz, Written by Captain George Clutter of Wheeling, [West] Virginia, Captain of the the ‘Mountain Boys of Monongolia.’

Vera Cruz: 1847. Folded letter to Wheeling, Virginia with learly struck two-line datestamp with "Paid 10" manuscript rate and blue "Steam" handstamp of New Orleans on 1847, with an unusual “Steam” marking applied in New Orleans. Fine condition. Fine. Item #List2439

A descriptive and interesting letter from Captain George W. Clutter of Wheeling, Virginia, describing the scenes and food in Vera Cruz in detail. Clutter had enlisted a detachment of thirty-two men in early 1847 in Monongalia County for service in the war, who would eventually become known as the “Mountain Boys of Monongalia.” Clutter was promoted to the captaincy upon the resignation of John Tyler. The company sailed in June of 1847 on the Brig “Tuckahoe” from Old Point Comfort to Point Isabel, where they marched to join General Taylor’s forces.

This interesting letter, written by Clutter from Vera Cruz, describes the city and cuisine of Vera Cruz in detail. He writes, “I am now boarding at the best Hotel in the city - it is called "Bells Stage House'. It is kept by a German lady, in great grandeur. The quantity of fruit here is astonishing. Oranges are for sale at about the rate apples would sell in the Wheeling market. I only wish I could send you and the children some of them - such ones as you never eat in the United States, as it would be impossible to carry them so far without rotting.

As we get dinner here at 3 o'clock and no such thing as supper is known, I stepped out this evening and obtained a 'cup of chocolate' and 'toast'. If an American (or rather United States) cook could taste such chocolate as the Mexicans make, they never would attempt making the article again - and it is not so much in the simple making of the chocolate, but it's in preparing it at the start - for every family, even the provost, understands making the article from the Cocoa.” Clutter offers additional details on troop movements and logistics of the campaign. Other letters by Clutter during the period are held at the West Virginia Regional History Center at WVU.

Full contents follow:

Vera Cruz, Mexico
Thursday Sept. 30th 1847

When I wrote to you from the Brazos, I felt in rather a bad humor, and as I have arrived at this splendid city, the first splendid place I have found in Mexico, I will endeavor to write to you more at length than I did from the above named place. We left the Brazos at 5 o'clock P.M. on Monday, on board the Steamship Ohio, and without ever seeing the sun once during the voyage, arrived here today (Thursday) about 11 o'clock A.M. - truly a quick trip. None of our Regiment, except those who were favored with a passage on the Ohio, in Company with Brig. Genl. Cushing, are here yet. Those of our Regiment here, are as follows: Lieut. Col. Withers, Capt. Clay & his Company and Capt. Campbell & your humble servant, who came upon the sick list. I am much improved since the commencement of the voyage and will with a day or two's rest be able to take up the line of march by the time the Regiment gets ready to move forward to join Genl. Scott. [I must explain here, the balance of the Regiment is coming in ships, which may detain them two or three days, in which event I will have become rested]. I am now boarding at the best Hotel in the city - it is called "Bells Stage House'. It is kept by a German lady, in great grandeur. The quantity of fruit here is astonishing. Oranges are for sale at about the rate apples would sell in the Wheeling market. I only wish I could send you and the children some of them - such ones as you never eat in the United States, as it would be impossible to carry them so far without rotting.

As we get dinner here at 3 o'clock and no such thing as supper is known, I stepped out this evening and obtained a 'cup of chocolate' and 'toast'. If an American (or rather United States) cook could taste such chocolate as the Mexicans make, they never would attempt making the article again - and it is not so much in the simple making of the chocolate, but it's in preparing it at the start - for every family, even the provost, understands making the article from the Cocoa.

In this City may be seen all the fashionable, fine buildings and streets to be found in any city of the United States. Also, all the various, fancy and other goods now in the cities of the North & East can be found here.

I have not yet found another horse since my arrival, but must try and get one tomorrow. I hope my friend Pollock will receive the Mexican roan, 'J.B.' which I sent him from Brazos. From hard usage he is not in very good order at present, but with little care will be a very useful horse. Don't you ever ask the privilege of riding him, however. Mind I know him well.

As you have heard before this, Genl. Scott is in the City of Mexico, having sustained a very heavy loss in getting there. We expect to have considerable fighting between here and the City of Mexico ourselves. Time, however, will reveal all things.

The soreness in my legs which I complained of is better, but I fear exercise will cause it to return. What it will terminate in I am unable to say at present.

I received a letter from you at this place today, which was read with the usual interest, notwithstanding it was written on the 13th August, 17 days previous to the last one received at Sabinito, which was dated 30th August.

I have just bought five Vera Cruz papers, which I will send you. They are half Mexican, which half you can dispose of as you see proper. By the bye, Mr. Fleeson promised to send you the Matamoros Flag regular. Tell me if you get it.

Oct. 1st 1847

This morning I have been all over the city. It would take me a month to describe all the curiosities I have beheld. I will save that for a private chat some long evening, after my return.

I would like to have you, Dear little Ada, to examine and see the curiosities to be seen. When papa comes home he will bring you some of them.

My love to Sarah Ann. I would write longer to her had I time. My love to all my friends & acquaintances.

I am Dearest Sarah
your loving husband
Geo. W. Clutter

[to]
Sarah M. Clutter.

Price: $950.00